Law and Conversation

May 12, 2009

Ruth Reichl’s memoirs

Filed under: Books and writing,memoirs — Helen Gunnarsson @ 10:09 am
Tags: , , , ,

Gourmet magazine editor Ruth Reichl’s first memoir, “Tender At The Bone,” has been percolating up toward the top of my Want To Read list since it was published ten years ago.  Just a couple of weeks ago, she came out with a new installment, “Not Becoming My Mother: And Other Things She Taught Me Along the Way.”  Lauren Porcaro’s interview with Reichl on the New Yorker’s “The Book Bench” blog at http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/books/2009/05/the-exchange-ruth-reichl.html  caught my eye.  Some excerpts that I found particularly noteworthy follow:

 “My mother started out by being a very good girl. She did everything that was expected of her, and it cost her dearly. Late in her life she was furious that she had not followed her own heart; she thought that it had ruined her life, and I think she was right. One of mom’s greatest acts of generosity was that she trained me to be defiant. Her great gift to me was encouraging me to be the person that I wanted to be, not the one that she and my father wished I was.”

 Asked about Twitter as a public diary:  “[P]rivacy is overrated. My mother’s scraps of paper were shouts into the void, and I think she would have been much happier if she could have sent them into the world instead of sticking them in a box. We all want, very much, to be seen and understood.”

“We need to accept the fact that most families now have two working parents…. We need to understand that women should not have to choose between their children and their careers, and that the current way that works—forcing women to become Superwomen—is another kind of trap.”

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