Law and Conversation

August 18, 2010

Last will and testament as literature

Filed under: Books and writing,Law,Victorian literature — Helen Gunnarsson @ 7:41 am
Tags: , ,

Oh, this is exciting to those of us who love both the law and Victorian literature:  Cathrine Frank, assistant professor of English at the University of New England, has published “Law, Literature, and the Transmission of Culture in England, 1837-1925.”  From her university’s and the publisher’s websites:

Focusing on the last will and testament as a legal, literary, and cultural document, Cathrine O. Frank examines fiction of the Victorian and Edwardian eras alongside actual wills, legal manuals relating to their creation, case law regarding their administration, and contemporary accounts of “curious wills” in periodicals.

The press release from the University of New England quotes the author:  “It’s easy to play ‘spot the will’ in novels,” Frank said, “but one of the most fascinating things I found in my reading, from judges’ opinions to magazine articles, was how widespread the interest in wills was. Everyday people, not just the wealthy and their lawyers, were deeply interested in the idea of the will.”

I wrote earlier about probate law and literature here.

Hat tip:  The BronteBlog.

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2 Comments »

  1. Love the new look, Helen! I’ve got to get caught up on here–you are so prolific!

    Comment by Pat. D. — August 19, 2010 @ 11:03 pm | Reply

    • Pat, you are always so sweet! Thanks for visiting, and I hope you’ll come back.

      Comment by helengunnar — August 19, 2010 @ 11:20 pm | Reply


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