Law and Conversation

February 16, 2011

Lawyers in fiction

Since I posted earlier this week about Jane Gardam’s “Old Filth,” a novel with a retired British lawyer as its main character, I thought today it would be nice to highlight three other novels with lawyers as protagonists.  Some obvious possibilities came first to my mind: Harper Lee’s “To Kill A Mockingbird,” John Mortimer’s “Rumpole of the Bailey” series, and legal thrillers by Scott Turow, John Grisham, and other bestselling authors. 

Worthy as all of those are, though, I’d rather highlight some lesser-known books, or some that have fallen out of the spotlight.  Here are three such novels with lawyer characters that I particularly liked:

  1. The Forsyte Saga, by John Galsworthy.  This trilogy, which begins with The Man of Property, is a fascinating picture of Victorian and Edwardian England.  (Outmoded Authors goes into more depth on the Forsyte Chronicles here.)  Soames Forsyte is a creepy solicitor whose divorce is the main subject of the second book, “In Chancery.”  The story shows how wretched life could be for even women of the upper classes who were unlucky enough to be married to men they loathed because of their legal status as chattels in the not so distant past.  Galsworthy, incidentally, studied and practiced law before going on to a distinguished literary career, which included helping found PEN International and winning the Nobel prize for literature in 1932.
  2. The Floating Opera, by John Barth.  Tightly written and screamingly funny, this novel, which I read in law school, helped me see, as my class never did, that civil procedure could be a fascinating subject.
  3. Pudd’nhead Wilson, by Mark Twain.  Like Barth and Galsworthy, Twain certainly knew how to tell a good story, and this novella of pre-Civil War America is riveting even more than a century after its publication.

John Mullan of The Guardian posted lists of the 10 best lawyers and the 10 best bad lawyers in fiction that I found inspirational for my own ever-growing reading and rereading lists.  The ABA Journal also published a list of 25 great fictional lawyers who are not Atticus Finch, which inspired BL1Y of Bitter Lawyer to come up with a list of the 10 greatest fictional lawyers overlooked by the ABA.

Who’s your favorite fictional lawyer, good or bad?  Do leave a comment with your picks.

On a completely different topic, check out Dutch engineer Theo Jansen’s Strandbeest site and associated videos.  I first learned about Jansen and his PVC beach animals several years ago, from a Radio Netherlands documentary.  There’s a more recent video from the BBC here that’s been making the rounds on Twitter.  Beautiful!

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1 Comment »

  1. […] This post was mentioned on Twitter by birkbecklaw, Kate Sutherland. Kate Sutherland said: Lawyers in fiction – Law and Conversation http://ow.ly/3XvAm […]

    Pingback by Tweets that mention Lawyers in fiction - Law and Conversation -- Topsy.com — February 16, 2011 @ 10:30 am | Reply


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