Law and Conversation

April 29, 2011

The royal wedding, law, and story

UK freelance writer Alex Aldridge has provided a 3-part legal perspective on today’s royal wedding for Above The Law, including quotes from some who believe that Will and Kate have a signed prenuptial agreement and at least one who thinks they don’t. And Penelope Trunk lends some affirmation for my fascination with the royal wedding by acknowledging her own in a thoughtful post in which she muses on how Will and Kate will build a happy life together by finding meaningful work.

Media reports notwithstanding, we don’t and can’t really know much of the real story of this royal couple’s romance–though it’s very pleasant to see that they seem happy and very much in love, and at least as likely to remain so as any newlyweds. For some really detailed accounts of other aristocratic relationships, history provides a more fertile field.

It’s hard to beat Stella Tillyard‘s “Aristocrats,” the story of Caroline, Emily, Louisa, and Sarah Lennox, 1740-1832, for a marvelous story of 18th century marriage among the English gentry. For other stories of upper-class alliances that clearly set forth the role of completely non-romantic factors in marriage negotiations–i.e. money and social rank–read not only the nonfiction “Consuelo and Alva Vanderbilt:  The Story of a Daughter and a Mother in the Gilded Age,” by Amanda Mackenzie Stewart, but also any of Jane Austen‘s novels and Edith Wharton‘s sadly unfinished “The Buccaneers,” among other titles.  What I’m currently reading, Anthony Trollope’s “The Way We Live Now,” is a completely cynical look at marriage among the 19th century’s English upper classes that’s guaranteed to cast a dark veil over any starry eyes.

Stella Tillyard said “I’ve always thought that one of the reasons why people read biography is to find out ordinary things. We tend to read the lives of extraordinary people in order to find out details of ordinary life.” What do you think?

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3 Comments »

  1. Great to hear that you’re reading ‘The Way We Live Now’, it’s one of Trollope’s greatest novels, written at a time when saw around him greed and dishonesty, and deals with themes more often associated with Dickens.

    For more info on the plot and characters of TWWLN take a look at http://www.anthonytrollope.com/books/works/way_we_live_now_the_/

    Dominic
    Trollope Society
    Twitter trollopesociety
    Facebook search Trollope Society

    Comment by Dominic Edwardes — April 29, 2011 @ 3:03 pm | Reply

    • So glad for you to stop by and leave a comment, Dominic. Trollope deserves a much wider audience on this side of the pond!

      Comment by Helen Gunnarsson — April 29, 2011 @ 3:44 pm | Reply

  2. […] couldn’t resist posting last week about Will and Kate’s excellent wedding, including a reference to UK freelance writer Alex Aldridge’s 3-part series of royal wedding […]

    Pingback by Royal weddings, prenups, and hats « Law and Conversation — May 6, 2011 @ 12:05 am | Reply


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