Law and Conversation

December 9, 2010

Three fun books on food

For my Read This! post on Monday I highlighted Jeffrey Steingarten’s “It Must’ve Been Something I Ate,” a delightful compilation of Steingarten’s columns on food from Vogue magazine.  Today I have three other books on food as part of my weekly series recommending three books with a common theme that tell great stories:

1) Heat, by Bill Buford.  Account of the amateur chef and former Granta magazine editor of learning culinary techniques by working in the restaurant kitchen of his pal, renowned chef Mario Batali.  For a fun book group activity, count the number of times Batali uses the f-word.

2) Kitchen Confidential, by Anthony Bourdain.  Memoir of how the Travel Channel superstar got interested in food and started his career.  Bourdain tells a great story and doesn’t flinch when it comes to the less attractive aspects of his own behavior, one of the marks of a really good memoirist.

3)  Food Matters:  A Guide to Conscious Eating, by Mark Bittman.  Bittman’s articles on food and cooking in The New York Times are superb examples of storytelling; as I noted on Monday, the one on no-knead bread can change your life.  In this book, he recounts his own journey toward awareness of what he eats.  As a bonus, he includes a number of recipes.

If you have an interest in cooking, the forums on ChefTalk.com are a great place to go for advice. 

Three’s a lovely number, but any list of three books necessarily omits many others that are equally good or even better.  What food books have you enjoyed?

UPDATE:  Commenting on an editorial by David Frum on CNNMark Bittman weighs in on obesity and the military’s “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy.

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March 19, 2010

Eleven great memoirs

For literary pundits, the memoir genre is one of the subjects du jour.  I’ve been listening to serious debates on a number of podcasts on whether it’s OK for writers to include fictional events in books that they then dub as “memoirs.”  One memoirist referred to her own as “true,” but not necessarily “factual,” a distinction that I frankly don’t buy (much as I did enjoy her books).

Here are eleven memoirs I’ve enjoyed and which, as far as I can tell, are both truthful and factual:

 “How I Became Hettie Jones,” by writer Hettie Jones, who married LeRoi Jones, n/k/a Amiri Baraka.

“Minor Characters,” by the writer Joyce Johnson, who was a minor character in Jack Kerouac’s life, though he was a major character in hers.

“Shakespeare and Company,” by that Parisian bookshop’s owner, Sylvia Beach, who published James Joyce’s “Ulysses” when nobody else would (and who largely supported Joyce and his family while they were in Paris).

“Baltimore’s Mansion,” by Canadian writer Wayne Johnston, about growing up in Newfoundland.

“Wishful Drinking,” by Carrie Fisher, a delightful transcription of her current standup routine.

“Love By The Glass,” by Dorothy J. Gaiter and John Brecher, a married couple who write for twelve years, until December 2009, wrote the wine column for The Wall Street Journal.

“The Road From Coorain,” by Jill Ker Conway, president of Smith College from 1975-1985, now a visiting professor at MIT, originally from Australia.

“The Glass Castle,” by former gossip columnist and writer Jeannette Walls.

“Never Have Your Dog Stuffed,” by actor and director Alan Alda.

“Kitchen Confidential,” by bad-boy chef, travel host, and writer Anthony Bourdain.

“Dreams From My Father,” by, of course, our President, Barack Obama.

A bonus:  I don’t know any of the authors, but I’m pretty sure none of these books were ghostwritten!

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