Law and Conversation

June 17, 2011

#FridayReads!

I like to participate in the #FridayReads meme on Twitter. The idea is that every Friday those who like can tweet what they’re reading with the hashtag #FridayReads in the tweet. Putting # without a space immediately before a term transforms it into a hyperlink. You can then click on the hyperlink to see other tweets with that hashtag. So, clicking on #FridayReads in any tweet will take you to a page with an aggregation of the most recent tweets containing that term. The meme seems to get more popular every week and now has its own Facebook page, complete with prizes for those who participate.

This week, I have several books going at once.  Each is from a different genre–one work of fiction, one fictional graphic novel, and one nonfiction–but the three have a common theme: lawyers and law enforcement. My #FridayReads tweet contains all three: John Mortimer’s “Rumpole Omnibus,” Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons’s “Watchmen,” and Steve Bogira’s “Courtroom 302.” I expect it will take me a while to finish all of them, but I often like to be reading several books at a time. I’m enjoying thinking about the different angles and ways that the different writers tell their stories, and I’m thinking that I may be able to see some parallels in these three very different books.

I have an extra incentive to read each book, too:  on different occasions lawyers recently recommended each to me. I’d like to be able to tell those lawyers that I’ve read their recommendations and compare our views the next time I happen to see them! Since I’ve read enough of each to have become quite captivated by their stories, this won’t be a difficult commitment for me to keep.

In the meantime, I’ve been continuing to ponder The Book Show’s list of novels everyone should have read by the age of 21. I have lots of thoughts about that list and about what list I’d create if I were to do so. I hope to post some of those thoughts next week, so please check back with me then.

What’s your #FridayReads?

February 16, 2011

Lawyers in fiction

Since I posted earlier this week about Jane Gardam’s “Old Filth,” a novel with a retired British lawyer as its main character, I thought today it would be nice to highlight three other novels with lawyers as protagonists.  Some obvious possibilities came first to my mind: Harper Lee’s “To Kill A Mockingbird,” John Mortimer’s “Rumpole of the Bailey” series, and legal thrillers by Scott Turow, John Grisham, and other bestselling authors. 

Worthy as all of those are, though, I’d rather highlight some lesser-known books, or some that have fallen out of the spotlight.  Here are three such novels with lawyer characters that I particularly liked:

  1. The Forsyte Saga, by John Galsworthy.  This trilogy, which begins with The Man of Property, is a fascinating picture of Victorian and Edwardian England.  (Outmoded Authors goes into more depth on the Forsyte Chronicles here.)  Soames Forsyte is a creepy solicitor whose divorce is the main subject of the second book, “In Chancery.”  The story shows how wretched life could be for even women of the upper classes who were unlucky enough to be married to men they loathed because of their legal status as chattels in the not so distant past.  Galsworthy, incidentally, studied and practiced law before going on to a distinguished literary career, which included helping found PEN International and winning the Nobel prize for literature in 1932.
  2. The Floating Opera, by John Barth.  Tightly written and screamingly funny, this novel, which I read in law school, helped me see, as my class never did, that civil procedure could be a fascinating subject.
  3. Pudd’nhead Wilson, by Mark Twain.  Like Barth and Galsworthy, Twain certainly knew how to tell a good story, and this novella of pre-Civil War America is riveting even more than a century after its publication.

John Mullan of The Guardian posted lists of the 10 best lawyers and the 10 best bad lawyers in fiction that I found inspirational for my own ever-growing reading and rereading lists.  The ABA Journal also published a list of 25 great fictional lawyers who are not Atticus Finch, which inspired BL1Y of Bitter Lawyer to come up with a list of the 10 greatest fictional lawyers overlooked by the ABA.

Who’s your favorite fictional lawyer, good or bad?  Do leave a comment with your picks.

On a completely different topic, check out Dutch engineer Theo Jansen’s Strandbeest site and associated videos.  I first learned about Jansen and his PVC beach animals several years ago, from a Radio Netherlands documentary.  There’s a more recent video from the BBC here that’s been making the rounds on Twitter.  Beautiful!

August 4, 2010

Great fictional lawyers

Filed under: Books and writing,fiction,Law — Helen Gunnarsson @ 9:34 am
Tags: , ,

The ABA Journal has a good piece on the 25 greatest fictional lawyers.  Most are from TV or the silver screen, but some are also from novels that gave rise to the film versions.  The article does a service in highlighting some lesser-known, older novels; it says upfront that it intentionally omitted Atticus Finch from Harper Lee’s “To Kill A Mockingbird” because Finch is such a watershed figure.  After reading the ABA piece, I’m putting John Mortimer’s Rumpole books on my ever-growing and totally unwieldy reading list.

Here’s a link to “Earth From Above,” some amazing aerial landscape photographs by Yann Arthus-Bertrand.  Fascinating and magnificent, good to show or remind children and adults alike of what amazing things there are on this planet.

What’s on your reading list?

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