Law and Conversation

April 17, 2012

Kate Sutherland on Adrienne Rich

Filed under: poetry,women — Helen Gunnarsson @ 12:01 am
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Such a pleasure to hear the CBC’s Michael Enright interviewing law professor Kate Sutherland–one of my absolute favorites on Twitter–on the work of feminist poet and essayist Adrienne Rich, who recently died at the age of 82. You can still listen to it, either on podcast or through the CBC’s website.

August 19, 2011

Getting rid of books?

Filed under: Books and writing — Helen Gunnarsson @ 4:21 pm
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Lawyers create and receive so much paper that lots of us have serious paper clutter, organization, and retention problems–so much that bar associations and other CLE providers give seminars on how to address it. Though I don’t currently practice law, and though I route as much mail to the recycling bin as possible the minute it comes in the door, I still have a paper clutter problem–I think it’s partly genetic ;-).

I also have a book clutter issue. My family all loves to read, and we love having lots of books on our shelves. If we’ve already read them, we might reread or refer to them–plus, when we really love them, they seem like friends. We also have lots of books we haven’t yet read but want to. And we’re not big fans of e-readers, yet–though I daresay I’ll start using and even liking one at some point.

The result is that we have a LOT of bookshelves, and they’re all full. In fact, books are double-shelved on all of them. Our nightstands have not only nice, broad tops with plenty of surface space for stacks of books in addition to lamps and clocks, but also handy, roomy shelves underneath that are just right for–more books. I catch myself eying wall space and considering whether, with some rearranging, another tall bookshelf might fit.

It’s really hard for me to make decisions about culling books. But I’ve had to face some reality: we don’t have unlimited space for new acquisitions. I use the public library for most books I want to read and am working on reconciling myself to getting rid of some books that I’m reasonably confident the library will continue to keep available. Though we’re mourning the demise of Borders, we are lucky to have a Half Price Books outlet in our area. It’s a good deal to take in 2 bags of books you don’t want and know nobody in your household is ever going to read again and exchange them for one book that you really do want and will read or use, as I did last year: you win and the business wins.

Apparently we’re in good company, for I’ve been seeing a number of articles lately on this very issue. When a friend raised it lately on her Facebook/Twitter feed, I remembered a podcast of the CBC’s The Sunday Edition I’d listened to some months ago with a roundtable discussion among several passionate booklovers about weeding out books, led by host Michael Enright.

I wanted to send the link to my friend so she could listen to it, too, but I’d deleted it from my iPod after listening, and couldn’t find it on the CBC’s website. So I messaged the producer with my question. A few days later, I got a nice response with the link to the program with the discussion. It’s in the second half of Hour Two.

Thanks so much, CBC! I love listening to this program as well as several others on podcast as I’m going about my errands here in suburban Chicago. Once again, the internet is bringing the world closer together!

How do you deal with clearing out books?

April 29, 2009

Canadian novelist Anne Michaels on writing

Filed under: Books and writing — Helen Gunnarsson @ 9:58 am
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The CBC (Canadian Broadcasting Corporation) has some fine podcasts. My current favorites are “Writers and Company,” with host Eleanor Wachtel, and “Sunday Morning,” with host Michael Enright. Both Wachtel and Enright are terrific interviewers, displaying inquiring minds and unfeigned interest in what their subjects have to say.

Enright interviewed novelist Anne Michaels, winner of the Orange Prize, one of the most prestigious prizes for fiction, in 2007 for her novel “Fugitive Pieces,” on April 5, 2009. I haven’t read anything she’s written and, in fact, hadn’t heard of her before listening to this podcast, but I enjoyed the interview. Here’s a Michaels quote from the podcast that gave me food for thought: “One reason why I write is because I want to live better—be a better human being. I want to challenge myself with certain questions. I think that a [novel]… provides a safe place to talk about things that are not safe.”

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